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Lower Decks is the Trek of Treks

Star Trek: Lower Decks, the Cure for Kelvin

One Starfleet ensign roughly hanging her arm around a second.
Ensigns Mariner and Boimler
Two Starfleet ensigns reading a PADD.
Ensigns Tendi and Rutheford
A Starfleet vessel.
The USS Cerritos
A group of Starfleet officers in mid-combat.
Some of the Cerritos Bridge Crew

As the first fantastic season of Star Trek: Lower Decks comes to a close, it should be clear to any self-respecting Trek fan that it is all things good and pure from Gene Roddenberry’s science fiction creation, and nothing like that horrid, soulless Kelvin “red matter” universe that appeared a few times in theaters…. and that One Bad Show.

Taking place just after Star Trek: The Next Generation and the USS Enterprise, ST:LD follows the exploits of a small group of junior officers on a just slightly less important Starfleet vessel: the USS Cerritos. With a awesome ensemble voice cast and heartfelt, razor-sharp writing, it both joyfully celebrates and wickedly deconstructs the beloved franchise.

The case can easily be made than those JJ-verse films were produced by and for people who didn’t know — or even hated — the established Star Trek universe. In stark contrast, Lower Decks is clearly Star Trek by and for people who truly love and respect its long history. Each and every episode is stuffed with deep, deeeep cuts from almost every Star Trek property since TOS (The Old Scientists) up to and NOT including Picard.

Leave the lens flares behind, and enjoy the best Star Trek property in production today, and be prepared to miss a few ridiculously obscure references in each and every episode.

Written by in October of 2020. Last edited October 2020.

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