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Robotic Rascals

Jean-Paul Mavinga

A small cyborg child sits in a red rock landscape.
A shapely woman crawls out of a very small tank.
Two children fly though a desolate urban region.
A woman with blond hair and a white cowboy hat casually stands.
A young woman with a puzzle-cut head stares serenely.

As we hurdle headlong into a new age of wonders, could it be we’re losing a bit of our humanity? Jean-Paul Mavinga explores this technological evolution in many of his works, makes a compelling case for eagerly anticipating our self-mechanized future.

The transhuman heroes of Mr. Mavinga’s world have certainly embraced a much grander vision of human perfection, and some are so intensely modified that very little organic components remain. Other, more traditionally composed characters seem largely unchanged, yet still enjoy the fruits of an robotics-rich world.

Should we fear what our minds and bodies will become, or will we accept a scientifically enhanced existence? Jean-Paul convincingly reveals the beauty of embracing the best of the organic and mechanical.

Written by in March of 2014. Last edited September 2014.

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